SIERRA HULL

Boulder Weekly Presents

SIERRA HULL

The Railsplitters

Sun Aug 27

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Fox Theatre

$20.00 - $25.00

Ages 15+ without a parent

All tickets are non-exchangeable and non-refundable following purchase

Listed price does not include tax and service charge

Price is the same online, over the phone, or in the Box Office.

NO BAGS

The Sierra Hull performance on Sunday, August 27th with The Railsplitters at the Boulder Theater has been moved to the Fox Theatre. All Boulder Theater tickets will be honored. Tickets for the Fox Theatre performance on sale now.

Sierra Hull
Sierra Hull
This is where a preternatural talent becomes a natural woman.

This is Sierra Hull's Weighted Mind. It is nothing like what we thought it would be. It is nothing like what we've heard before, from anyone. It is singular and emphatic, harmonious and dissonant. It is the realization of promise, and the affirmation of individuality. It is born of difficulty and indecision, yet it rings with ease, decisiveness, and beauty.

"She plays the mandolin with a degree of refined elegance and freedom that few have achieved," says Bela Fleck, the genre-leaping banjo master who produced Weighted Mind. "And now her vocals and songwriting have matured to the level of her virtuosity."

Alison Krauss, who has won more Grammy awards than any female artist in history, says of Hull, "I think she's endless. I don't see any boundaries. Talent like hers is so rare, and I don't think it stops. It's round."

Hull came to us as a bluegrass thrush, a teen prodigy. Krauss called her to the Grand Ole Opry stage when Hull was 11-years-old. Two years later, she signed with Rounder Records, and soon became known as a remarkable mandolin player, a tone-true vocalist, and a recording artist of high order. She made two acclaimed albums. She played the White House, and Carnegie Hall, and the Kennedy Center, and she became the first bluegrass musician to receive a Presidential Scholarship at the Berklee College of Music.

She was celebrated, yet adrift. Stranded, even.

What she felt at 22 was not what she felt at 12, and the music Sierra Hull was writing and playing at home was different from the music she was making on stages.

"In some way, I was needing to run from the thing that everybody thought I was being," she says now, at 24.

But she wasn't running so much as plodding.

She fielded myriad opinions about hypothetical courses. She grew vulnerable, and weighted, and she wrote songs about all of that. She found solace in an antique Brenda Ueland book that advised, "Everybody is original, if he tells the truth, if he speaks from himself."
The Railsplitters
The Railsplitters
Fresh off the success of their first album, and taking first place in Rockygrass’ Best New Band Competition, Colorado natives, The Railsplitters got busy touring the US, meeting wider audiences, and of course, spending hours in the tour van! As you can imagine from five members traveling across the United States, the musical array pouring out of the van onto the open highway was wildly eclectic, crossing over genre and time. From boundary breaking trip hop and electronica groups like Gorillaz and Thievery Corporation, to more direct influences like The Infamous Stringdusters and Lake Street Dive, the musical potpourri heard in their time on the road eventually began to seep into the band’s own music. With their new album, The Faster It Goes, they’re using these new sounds to break the bonds of bluegrass and unleash tradition. Lauren Stovall and the rest of the ‘Splitters suggest that using your roots to evolve is really at the heart of the genre, not unlike Bill Monroe, who himself was an innovator. With their finger on the pulse, The Railsplitters are pushing the genre forward with an adventurous spirit, carrying in the tradition of breaking boundaries with their innovative sound.

The Railsplitters’ secret weapon is two-fold: first, the innovative imagination of banjo player Dusty Rider’s songwriting, who writes with the full band in mind, imagining an entire song in his head before it’s even heard it out loud. Second, the powerfully distinct vocals of Lauren Stovall whose voice is as clean as Emmylou, as cutting as Allison Krauss, and carrying some of the attitude of Dolly herself. Lauren’s vocal lines fill The Railsplitters’ sound with something distinct and undeniable. In addition, part of The Railsplitters’ new color is brought on by the band’s newest member, Joe D'Esposito, whose New England-influenced fiddling adds new directions to the band’s sound. With masterfully executed mandolin and banjo by Peter Sharpe and Dusty Rider, and well supported by upright bassist Leslie Ziegler’s innovative style, The Faster It Goes testifies to The Railsplitters’ multipolar and collaborative songwriting, giving voice to the impressive talents of its members and a cohesive character to the sound.

From the first track, “Tilt-A-Whirl,” it’s clear the The Faster It Goes is exploring modern speeds: “My mind is like an old Tilt-A-Whirl, it never seems to stop, not even for this girl.” With the foot-stomping drive of a reworked traditional tune like, “Salt Salt Sea,” or the complex harmony and aggressive rhythms in “It’s A Little Late,” The Railsplitters are trying to keep up with life, the faster, and faster it goes. While these songs pack an edge and highlight the band’s progression into more pop-influenced numbers, The Railsplitters know that life isn’t only lived in the fast lane, taking a few moments to unwind with earthy tracks like “The Estuary,” which pays tribute to their musical mountain roots, and the album’s hidden track, “Sweet Little Miss Blue Eyes.”

Though they operate with the instrumentation of a bluegrass band, The Railsplitters are making music totally unlimited by tradition. This is music for the open road, the open dance floor, and open ears--music of the American West, made for all.
Venue Information:
Fox Theatre
1135 13th St
Boulder, CO, 80302
http://www.foxtheatre.com